Copacabana – Not Typical Bolivia

Of all of the places that we visited while we were in Bolivia, Copacabana felt strangely out of place. It was very much a tourist destination with resorts sitting on the shores of Lake Titicaca.  We’re glad that we went to Copacabana towards the end of our trip in Bolivia and not at the beginning because it might have completely changed the way that we viewed the country.  It was the only place in Bolivia where we saw other travelers, mostly on their way out of Bolivia and heading into Peru, which is on the other side of the lake, with Cusco and Machu Picchu being within a day’s travel.  If they weren’t heading out of Bolivia, they were on their way into Bolivia from Peru and heading to Uyuni Salt Flats, seemingly the only place that people visit in Bolivia.  We sat in a café and watched the parade of young people with their backpacks getting into or out of buses as they passed through this idyllic little town.

View of Copacabana

View of Copacabana

Bus on a Ferry

Bus on a Ferry

View from the Resort

View from the Resort

Main Street of Copacabana

Main Street of Copacabana

Like everyplace we visited in Bolivia, it wasn’t easy to get to Copacabana, the roads were horrendous with apparent construction every few thousand feet where it just seemed that the road was torn up for no apparent reason.  The only construction workers that we saw were placing rocks on parts of the road that were apparently re-paved, but weren’t ready for traffic yet or they just didn’t want traffic to be able to move smoothly.  We also had to take a ferry across part of Lake Titicaca with cars and buses floating back and forth.  We know it is a pretty common Latin American attitude, but no one is in a hurry to get anyplace in Bolivia and we got used to sitting and waiting everywhere that we went, including when crossing on the ferry.  You wouldn’t know that Lake Titicaca and Copacabana are one of the biggest tourist destinations in Bolivia based upon the road conditions, but apparently thousands of tourists and Bolivians visit Copacabana all of the time.

Rocks on the Road

Rocks on the Road

Traffic on the Road to Lake Titicaca

Traffic on the Road to Lake Titicaca

The Slow Ferry Ride

The Slow Ferry Ride

Woman with Baby Alpacas

Woman with Baby Alpacas

The resort where we stayed had incredible views of the bay and we were promised a gorgeous sunset over Lake Titicaca and we weren’t disappointed.  After days of non-stop running from place to place, it was actually pretty nice to sit and relax in a beach resort, a very different experience than anything else that we did in Bolivia.  Instead of Spanish, it seemed that French and German were the dominating languages while we were in Copacabana, a strange change of pace.  As with every resort town, there were plenty of restaurants and food stalls along the beach to choose from and a cold cerveza was an absolute must.  We ended up having lunch at a place called Manchester United, named after the English Premier Football (Soccer) team, which seemed an odd choice for a name, and had an incredible version of Pollo Macho.

Sunset from Our Room

Sunset from Our Room

Pollo Macho

Pollo Macho

Manchester United Restaurant

Manchester United Restaurant

View of Copacabana from Lake Titicaca

View of Copacabana from Lake Titicaca

View of Copacabana

View of Copacabana

When we first arrived in town we headed to the local church, which is the center of every town in Bolivia.  Apparently people from around Bolivia come to Copacabana to have their new cars blessed by the Catholic priest and then they drive it up to the temple on top of the mountain outside of town to have it blessed by a Quechua priest as well.  Two blessings, one location.  The cars are elaborately adorned with an array of flowers and they looked as though they were being prepared for a parade.  In fact, there are so many cars that come to Copacabana to be blessed that there is a very active market across the street from the church taking advantage of all of the people who have come to visit.  The church itself was beautiful and is the typical Spanish style church found all over Bolivia, which is an extremely religious country.

Church in the Main Square

Church in the Main Square

Vehicle to be Blessed

Vehicle to be Blessed

Market by the Church

Market by the Church

Arched Entrance to the Church

Arched Entrance to the Church

Temple for the Quechua Blessing

Temple for the Quechua Blessing

The following day we would venture out onto Lake Titicaca to visit the islands and learn about the temples, but our day in Copacabana was completely relaxing.  The hotels were some of the nicest that we saw anyplace in Bolivia and the town had a Bolivian flare to a beach resort.  If it weren’t for the women dressed in typical Aymara clothing, you wouldn’t even know that you were still in Bolivia.  With all of the boats in the bay, hotels, restaurants, and shops, we could have easily been on the coast of the Mediterranean instead of Lake Titicaca.  It is certainly worth visiting if you go to Bolivia, but make sure that you visit other parts of Bolivia first so that you have a greater appreciation for the amenities that this resort town has to offer.

Vehicles Being Decorated

Vehicles Being Decorated

Beautiful Church

Beautiful Church

Crosses at the Church

Crosses at the Church

Spanish Statue

Spanish Statue

 

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7 Responses to Copacabana – Not Typical Bolivia

  1. So incredibly jealous of this adventure!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Such an interesting journey

    Like

  3. Bea dM says:

    Considering the state of the roads you’ve described, a double car blessing seems like a pretty necessary insurance policy 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  4. What a great trip! Really looking forward to each post from Bolivia.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Thanks, it was such a fascinating trip, we can’t wait to share more about it. 🙂

    Like

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