The Duomo in Florence, Italy

Suggesting that you should see the Duomo when visiting Florence is like suggesting that you should breathe, it is almost unavoidable. Not only does it dominate the skyline, but almost all of the roads will lead you there as well. With that said, it is truly one of the most stunning cathedrals in all of Europe. Officially called the Cattedrale di Santa Maria del Fiore or Cathedral of Saint Mary of the Flower, the Duomo has the largest brick dome in the world. The façade of the cathedral is as equally beautiful with its intricate details and uniquely white coloring compared to most other cathedrals.

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Cathedral Façade
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Giotto’s Campanile or the Bell Tower
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Beautiful Art Above the Doors
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Dominating the Skyline
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Pink and Green Marble Panels
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Details on the Bell Tower
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Looking Up at the Entrance

Construction began on the church in 1296 and it would take about 140 years to complete. The complex is made up of three buildings, the cathedral itself, the Baptistery, and Giotto’s Campanile, which is the bell tower. The Piazza del Duomo is definitely a crowded location as tourists flock to the area to see the Duomo of Firenze. You could spend hours looking at the details of the façade, which is made up of marble panels of pink and green with white borders. The artwork above the doors of the cathedral is as beautiful as the artwork that can be found in the city’s museums. You can also get tickets to enter the Baptistery, but even if you don’t enter, the ornate doors cannot be missed.

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Baptistery
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Ornate Doors
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Panel Details
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Standing in the Piazza
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Such Impressive Details
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The Center of Florence
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Statue on the Façade

To truly get an understanding of how impressive the size of the Duomo is, visit the Piazzale de Michelangelo which overlooks the city. Although there are other towers and churches in Florence, nothing compares to the magnificence of the Duomo. Between the dome and the bell tower, the cathedral truly dominates the historic city. There are many reasons to visit Florence, but seeing the Duomo is high on the list of things to see not only in Florence, but also in all of Italy if not Europe.

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View from Piazzale de Michelangelo
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One of the Gothic Windows
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So Much to See
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Looking Up at the Cathedral and Bell Tower
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Relief Above Another Door
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View from the Back
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Fascinating Statues
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View from the Piazza

 

24 thoughts on “The Duomo in Florence, Italy”

  1. Amazing photos of a beautiful city. Never made it to Florence although been to italy so many times but fingers crossed we’ll do it one day. Nice post.

  2. Hello, Great blog! Thank you for sharing. I’m from Florence and I’ve really enjoyed reading. You two look so so happy there! I’ve got a little story about the cathedral’s dome, that I like to share with you. “Il peposo” is a typical dish of Impruneta, a village in the hills around Florence, famous for the production of terracotta pots and tiles.

    Legend has it, that Filippo Brunelleschi came across this dish while he was directing the work on the dome of Sanata Maria del Fiore, Florence’s famous cathedral.

    Although the exact methodology used by Brunelleschi to erect the cupola remains a mystery, we are certain that only the best materials were used, such as the Carrara marble and the Terracotta tiles from Impruneta.

    With no time to lose and with so many tiles to fire up, labourers at Impruneta’s furnace worked morning to night. Those in charge of preparing lunch had only a few coins to buy ingredients, so they decided to cook secondary meat cuts that were chopped into chunks and cooked with pepper corns in terracotta pots. The meat cooked near the big oven, but slowly, until tender. They say that it was Brunelleschi himself, impressed by the taste of this stew, who suggested adding Chianti to the dish to make it even better.

    I hope you enjoy the little story about the dome, and thank you again for sharing your magical time in Florence with us.

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