The Food of Prague

Prague is a popular tourist destination and, as such, it has wonderful selection of restaurants to choose from when dining out. It many ways, the food is similar to the rest of central Europe, but as always, there are slight variations. One of the common themes that we were served was a dumpling that was very similar to bread pudding. They are thick and dense and wonderful for soaking up the different gravies, but will definitely leave you feeling like you could use to do a few extra exercises.

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Fish Soup with Fried Chickpeas
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Templar Knights Restaurant
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Venison with Spinach and Potatoes
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Chefs Busy at Work

The other commonality is the various selections of wild game that were available, which was obviously due to the time of year. The United States talks a lot about fresh ingredients and serving what is most available for the season, but rarely do you actually find as many restaurants all carrying seasonal menus with traditional favorites. There was rabbit, deer, duck, goose, perch, as well as the typical pork and beef dishes. When prepared properly, these dishes taste wonderful and don’t have harsh flavors, which can sometimes happen when serving wild game.

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Deer with Bread Dumplings
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Rabbit in Plum Sauce with Doughnuts
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Perch with Capers
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Snails and Potato Cakes

We were in Prague over the holidays, so we did find some set menus on Christmas Day, but there were still wonderful choices to select from. In fact, the only disappointing meal that we ate while we were in Prague was at a medieval restaurant that was part of our tour the one day. The restaurant was very touristy and the food, which was served to large tour groups, was obviously mass prepared. That is to be expected when having a meal as part of a large group such as this, but it is possible to create meals that are flavorful and tender, even under these circumstances, so it was a shame.

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Christmas Dinner
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There must be Champagne
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Ice Cream for Dessert
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Sauerbraten

Overall, the food of Prague was truly wonderful and enhanced what was already an amazing experience. We would certainly recommend going to one of the many restaurants that are in the Mala strana, which is just a section of the old town area. It is highly recommended that you make reservations during the weekends or busy tourist times, which seems to be just about all of the time. There are few places open between 15:00 and 18:00, typical of much of Europe, so plan your day accordingly.

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Sausages, Peppers, and Onions
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Dinner at the Medieval Restaurant
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Pork Roast with Dumplings and Sauerkraut
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Goulash

 

How to See Wildlife When Hiking

We’ve been hiking in the mountains for years and have been fortunate to see our share of wildlife. Even better, we haven’t seen any bears or mountain lions, but we’ve come across fresh tracks and have been pretty certain that they’ve seen us. They say that if you hike in the mountains of Colorado, on about one out of ten hikes, a mountain lion has seen you, even though you don’t see them. With that in mind, we thought we’d share some tips to help you see wildlife when you hike, but always put safety first.  Seasoned hikers will likely notice that most of these tips are in complete contrast to the tips for avoiding bears when hiking.  If you’re hiking in bear country, always talk to the rangers and find out where there have been recent sightings and where the bears are most likely to be active.  Never intentionally put yourself in harm’s way.

Black Bear - We Were in Yellowstone, Not Hiking
Black Bear – We Were in Yellowstone, Not Hiking
Mule Deer
Mule Deer
  1. Be extremely observant – This is probably the most obvious, but if you’re not constantly scanning the area around, you’re likely walking by animals without even knowing it.  It is always best if you see the animals before they see you, especially if there is even a remote chance that the animal could harm you, which is almost always the case.  Almost any animal when startled or threatened has the potential to attack, so seeing them first allows you to control the situation.
    Elk
    Elk

    Wild Turkeys
    Wild Turkeys
  2. Don’t make a lot of noise, talking in quieter voices.  You don’t have to be completely silent, in fact we’d recommend that you make some noise and talk, just a normal pitch.  If you’re making some noise, you’re less likely to startle an animal that perhaps you didn’t see, but still be quiet enough not to spook an animal that is farther away.  There was one time when we were hiking near Beaver Creek, Colorado, when we ended up startling a young doe, even though we were talking and not being overly quiet.  The deer literally ran into us as she made here escape, scaring us as much as we scared her.
    Camouflaged
    Camouflaged

    Deer Checking Us Out
    Deer Checking Us Out
  3. Hike in smaller groups, usually three or less.  Pretty much for the same reason as number two, the larger the group, the more noise that you make.  Also, the more people in the group, the more motion that you make, the more reflective surfaces to catch the sun, the more noticeable that you are.  Remember, the animals are watching for you as much as you might be searching for them.  Just as you are more likely to notice a herd of deer versus as single deer, so is it true of them seeing you.
    Mom with Baby Ducks
    Mom with Baby Ducks

    Big Horn Sheep
    Big Horn Sheep
  4. Watch for anything that moves.  Being observant and scanning the horizon isn’t always enough, you need to pay attention to any motion that see.  Sure, more often than not, it will be caused by the wind, but the animals are camouflaged, making them hard to see.  What at first seems like the rustling of a leaf, might just turn out to be the wiggling of an ear.  And if you see one animal, be extra careful, there are probably several more just out of sight.
    Ears Wiggling
    Ears Wiggling

    Trying to Hide
    Trying to Hide
  5. Hike more remote, less frequented, trails.  It doesn’t do any good to do everything possible to see wildlife if there are a hundred hikers in front of you doing the exact opposite.  Getting away from roads, towns, and most importantly other hikers, will definitely increase your chances of seeing wildlife.  Be smart, though, carry bear spray, phone, flashlight, compass, and extra food if you’re heading into remote areas.  We always stay on well-marked trails and don’t go venturing off into the woods.  The national forest system in Colorado is huge and you could easily get yourself lost for days if decide to go trailblazing.
    Majestic Moose in Yellowstone
    Majestic Moose in Yellowstone

    More Big Horn Sheep
    More Big Horn Sheep
  6.  Hike near dawn or dusk.  Animals are always most active around these times, so be extra alert when hiking at these times of day.  Light can be an issue as the shadows are longer and it isn’t as easy to see off into the distance.  Take your time when hiking during these times so that you don’t startle an animal that you didn’t see as well as to give yourself time to truly see what is around you.
    Birds are Wildlife Too
    Birds are Wildlife Too

    Hard to See
    Hard to See
  7. Carry binoculars or camera with a telephoto lens.  Obviously it makes it easier to see animals in the distance if you can zoom in and focus closer on them.  It is also the safest way to observe animals without putting yourself at risk.  We’re not professional photographers, but we did invest in a telephoto lens a few years ago and it was one of the best investments we’ve made.
    Grizzly Bear Shot with Telephoto Lens
    Grizzly Bear Shot with Telephoto Lens in Yellowstone Bear Preserve

    Okay, He Was Just Cute
    Okay, He Was Just Cute
  8. Spend time in locations that are likely to draw animals.  Sources of water and food are the most likely places to find animals, so spending time near those locations, especially at dusk or dawn, will increase your chances of seeing them.  Animals also use the trails to get through the forest as much as hikers do, simply because it is easier for them to walk on the trails, so staying on the trails will increase your chances of seeing them.  Sometimes the most likely place to see animals isn’t where you might expect it.  One of our funniest stories about seeing animals in the wild was when we were in Estes Park, Colorado, many years ago.  We had gone hiking at dusk and waited by an open field with a stream running through it and, after much waiting, a herd of elk finally appeared.  It was autumn, so the temperatures quickly dropped and we were frozen by the time we got back to the car, but we were happy to have seen the elk.  We drove back to our hotel and lo and behold there were hundreds of elk walking around the property nibbling on the fresh grass.  It hadn’t crossed our minds that they would be drawn to the green grass of the hotel versus foraging for food in the wild.
    Elk in the River
    Elk in the River

    Eating Grass in Town
    Eating Grass in Town

Hopefully you will have as much luck as we’ve had seeing wildlife by using these tips.  We can’t say it enough, though, be smart about it and don’t do anything too risky.  Always respect wildlife, some animals may look cute, but they are wild animals and therefore can be unpredictable.