Incallajta – Bread Basket of the Inca

One of the tours that took while we were in Cochabamba, Bolivia, was to the ruins at Incallajta. They are some of the most well-preserved ruins in Bolivia and it really gives you a sense of how great the Incan civilization was.  Sadly, not a lot is known for sure about the site and it seems that it is not often visited by tourists.  The main temple building is massive and is probably an indication as to how important the site was to the Incan empire.  In addition to being a ceremonial site, it was also the easternmost defensive fortification for the Inca, with a large wall to protect them from the rival tribes in the Amazon.

View of the Ruins from Above
View of the Ruins from Above
Building in Ruins
Building in Ruins
Our Guide, Remy
Our Guide, Remy
Us in the Temple
Us in the Temple

The area all around Incallajta is extremely fertile land, which is probably why it was so important to the Inca people.  Our guide, Remy, explained to us that much of the food for the empire was grown in this region, including the potatoes, strawberries, and quinoa.  We saw many farms all along the hills surrounding the ruins, with the farmers working the land on the steep hillsides in the same way that their ancestors had.  Food from the area was probably taken as far away as Machu Picchu and Tiwanaku.  We arrived at the entrance to the site where a Quechua woman watched us curiously from the office where we paid to tour the ruins.  From there we hiked up a trail through the trees until the first of the ruins became visible.

Farmland
Farmland
Quechua Woman
Quechua Woman
Walking to the Ruins
Walking to the Ruins
First Glimpse of the Ruins
First Glimpse of the Ruins

The entire site is almost overwhelming, there is so much to see and learn about the Inca people and the importance of Incallajta.  We walked along the stone walls, built with the same precision found in Tiwanaku, as Remy told us about the holes that were used by the soldiers to throw rocks at any approaching army.  Just as was the case with the castles of Europe, they built the holes at an angle so that spears and arrows couldn’t come through, protecting their warriors.  We hiked up to the area above the temples to see the soldiers barracks, very similar to a modern army of today.  As we hiked the steep hills, we had an appreciation to how good of shape these soldiers must have been in to walk the wall daily in defense of the empire.

The Stone Wall
The Stone Wall
Hole to Throw Stones
Hole to Throw Stones
Hiking the Ancient Trails
Hiking the Ancient Trails
Learning About the Area
Learning About the Area

The most impressive site at the ruins is the main temple, called kallanka.  Only the wooden roof and pillars a missing, making it the most interesting ruin that we saw while we were in Bolivia.  The large stone wall with the window-like ceremonial nooks where they would have likely had candles burning was absolutely amazing.  The temple is in such good condition that there are places where you can still see red plaster on top of the stone walls.  Outside of this communal temple was a large stone that has been worn smooth from all of the sacrifices that have taken place there in the past and apparently are still taking place today.

Main Wall of Kallanka
Main Wall of Kallanka
Plaster on the Wall
Plaster on the Wall
Inner Wall of the Temple
Inner Wall of the Temple
Sacrificial Stone
Sacrificial Stone

We climbed up to the top of an 3,300 meter (11,000 foot) hill that towers over the ruins to see the spectacular views of how vast the ruin site is.  It was a pretty tough hike and we were pretty winded by the time we reached the summit, but it was well worth the effort.  From the hills above, the massive size of kallanka was even more apparent than it was from standing within its walls.  Clearly, with such an important structure, this was a key city in the Inca empire.  Unfortunately, we may never know the true nature of things that occurred in Incallajta as there is no written records from the Inca, so the only things that we know for sure were written down by the Spanish who conquered them.

Looking Up to the Top
Looking Up to the Top
Building at the Top
Building at the Top
Views from the Summit
Views from the Summit
The Scale of the Temple
The Scale of the Temple

We continued past several homes that are still standing, pausing to think about the inhabitants that must have lived within those walls.  Most likely they were ancient priests as they would have been the only ones to have such extravagant buildings for the time period.  From there we climbed down to the bottom of a waterfall and ate our lunch, grateful for the break from all of the hiking.  On our way out of the ruins, we climbed to the top of what is assumed to be an astronomical observatory of sorts.  From there, they would have marked the seasons and tracked the celestial movements across the sky.

Resting at the Waterfall
Resting at the Waterfall
View from the Observatory
View from the Observatory
Home of a Priest
Home of a Priest
Another View of the Wall
Another View of the Wall

It was a wonderful day walking among the magnificent ruins.  As was most often the case, it was just the three of us wondering through these spectacular buildings.  There doesn’t appear to be any current interest from universities to come and study the site, which seems completely baffling to us considering how truly interesting the ruins seemed to be to us.  If you’re in the Cochabamba area, we would definitely recommend taking the time to visit Incallajta and walk the footsteps of the ancient Inca warriors, priests, and farmers.

Walking in the Steps of the Incan Empire

During our trip to Bolivia, we truly enjoyed visiting Incan ruins such as Incallajta and Tiwanaku. We learn so much about the ancient civilizations of Rome and Egypt, but very little is taught in schools about the Inca and the empire that they created in South America. Its size and political systems rivaled any other empire of the early 16th century. While we were in the ruins of Incallajta, we walked the same paths that the guards walked around the ancient city as they protected it from rival tribes that lived in the forests. Since there were no other tourists at the site and it was just us and our guide walking the trails, it was especially awe-inspiring. We climbed to about 11,000 feet (about 3,350 meters) where we had a spectacular view of the entire complex. Join us on the trails of the ancient Inca and walk with us as we traverse the outer wall of the ancient city of Incallajta.

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Walking an Incan Trail
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Looking Down on the Ruins
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Walking along the Ancient Walls
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Ancient Trails Converted to Roads
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The Path of the Incan Guards
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View from the Observatory

From Sun Island to Moon Island

We truly loved visiting the islands of Lake Titicaca.  For this week’s Discover Challenge: The Things We Leave Behind, we chose this photo from Sun Island with Moon Island off in the distance.  We have visited a lot of ruins, but seeing ruins on an island is a unique experience.

Temple on Sun Island with Moon Island in the Distance
Temple on Sun Island with Moon Island in the Distance