Our Fondue Tradition

When the kids were growing up, we started the tradition to fondue on New Year’s Eve and watch a marathon of movies. We would pick movies that had multiple movies in the series like Harry Potter, The Pirates of the Caribbean, Jason Bourne, Lord of the Rings, Batman, Ocean’s 13, etc. Whatever the movie, it was about being together as a family and eating a meal that was a shared experience.

Fondue Plate
Fondue Plate

Our children have all grown up and moved onto their own lives, but we continue to spend our New Year’s Eve eating fondue and watching movies until about an hour before midnight.  We do a peanut oil fondue with steak, chicken, mushrooms, and green peppers (we used to do hot dogs when the kids were younger).  Then we do our family curry sauce, chutney, and béarnaise sauce for dipping.  Although we love a good cheese or chocolate fondue, this is a perfect fondue for creating a hearty meal, especially when needing to offset all of the glasses of wine that lead up to our midnight toast.

Fondue Table
Fondue Table

Our New Year’s Day tradition is pork and sauerkraut, which is a Pennsylvania Dutch tradition that is meant to provide good luck throughout the coming year.  It works out really well since it is a slow cooker meal and we are usually moving a little slower after New Year’s Eve.  We’ve decided to share with you our curry fondue sauce recipe, which is obviously simple and can be used with other meals besides fondue.

Cooking in Peanut Oil
Cooking in Peanut Oil

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Mayonnaise
  • 3 tbsp Whole Milk (Skim can be used to lower the fat and calories)
  • 4 – 5 tsp Curry Powder
  • 1/2 tsp Tabasco Sauce

Instructions

In a medium size bowl, combine mayonnaise, milk, curry powder, and tabasco sauce.  Whisk together and chill for 30 minutes.  If it is too thick, simply add a dash more of milk and stir.

AdAmAn Club – New Year’s Eve on Pikes Peak

Picture of New Year's Eve Fireworks - Source Unknown, But Not Our Photograph
Picture of New Year’s Eve Fireworks – Source Unknown, But Not Our Photograph

Living at the base of “America’s Mountain”, Pikes Peak, provides some truly wonderful scenery. The summit, at 14,110 feet (about 4300 meters), looms above Colorado Springs and is a constant reminder of what a beautiful state that we live in. One of our favorite New Year’s Eve traditions is going out into our front yard, weather permitting, and watching the firework display from the top of Pikes Peak. The AdAmAn club has been climbing to the top of Pikes Peak every year since 1922 to light up the night sky.  We stand in awe as we watch the fireworks, not so much of the light display, but of the members who have hiked to top of the peak to set them off for all of us to see.

Pikes Peak from the Cog Railway
Pikes Peak from the Cog Railway
View from the Summit
View from the Summit
Lower Barr Trail
Lower Barr Trail
View from Barr Trail
View from Barr Trail

We’ve been to the summit several times, by car, by the cog railway, and we even hiked it once.  We hiked it in the middle of summer and can only imagine what it would be like to hike it in the bitter cold and snow of winter.  Going up the Barr trail to the summit of Pikes Peak was, without a doubt, the most difficult hike we’ve ever done.  We have tremendous respect to the men and women (they recently started allowing women to join the club) who make the annual trek to top of the peak, regardless of the weather.  Even if the weather doesn’t allow them to shoot off the fireworks, the intrepid group still makes the arduous climb every year.

Sign on Barr Trail, about 3 miles into the hike
Sign on Barr Trail, About 3 Miles into the Hike
Barr Trail at Tree Line
Barr Trail at Tree Line
Barr Camp is the Halfway Point
Barr Camp is the Halfway Point
We Were Exhausted When We Reached the Summit
We Were Exhausted When We Reached the Summit

Back in 1922, a group of five adventurous men decided that they wanted to do something unique to celebrate New Year’s Eve and decided to climb to the summit of Pikes Peak.  Fred and Ed Morath, Fred Barr (who created the trail that the club now hikes), Willis Magee, and Harry Standley made up the original group.  The weather on that first climb to top of the peak on New Year’s Eve was extremely cold and snowy.  Because the snow was so deep that year, the group decided to go up the Cog Railway tracks, which had been running since 1889, instead of the Barr Trail.  At 9 miles, it was shorter than the 13 miles on the Barr Trail, but was also more treacherous and dangerous.  At Windy Point, about a thousand feet above the tree line, the snowy conditions and wind had created snow drifts that were almost impassible, but the group managed to make their way through.  When they reached the summit, the “Frozen Five” as they were to become known, sheltered in the old summit house and thawed themselves out.  They had picked up flares that had been left by the railroad workers and at midnight, proud of their accomplishment, they lit their flares and fireworks that they’d brought with them, and the tradition began.

People Riding the Cog Railway
People Riding the Cog Railway
Windy Point at 12,000 Feet
Windy Point at 12,000 Feet
View from Barr Trail, Garden of the Gods at the Base of the Mountain
View from Barr Trail, Garden of the Gods at the Base of the Mountain
View of Pikes Peak from Barr Trail
View of Pikes Peak from Barr Trail
Fireworks above the Peak
Fireworks above the Peak from Our Front Porch

The following year, Fred and Ed Morath suggested the name AdAmAn (pronounced “Add A Man”) for the group and declared that they would only add one new member every year.  The group has continued to add one member every year ever since over the past 90+ years.  It may have seemed a highly unlikely choice for a New Year’s Eve tradition, but for those of us who watch in awe every year, we are glad that they decided to make the trek all those years ago.  While other’s are singing “Auld Lang Syne” in crowded ballrooms, surrounded by balloons, we’ll continue to toast champagne, bundled in heavy coats, and watching the fireworks from the top of Pikes Peak.  It is one of our treasured memories and something that we look forward to year after year.